Blog

The Writing Classroom as Studio

“While the fields of writing and science might strike many as completely different if not diametrically opposed, once I began to look more closely at their histories, I realized how much was shared. Notions of learning by doing—as opposed to learning by listening to lectures and regurgitating that content on multiple-choice exams, whether that doing […]

A Short Pause Goes a Long Way: Using the Pause Procedure in Teaching

By Anna Marie LaChance Picture yourself as an undergraduate student, sitting in a standard lecture hall, staring at a whiteboard as a professor makes their way through a long lecture. Maybe it’s a detailed mathematical derivation or a careful dissection of a literary work. You and the nearly one hundred other students sit in silence […]

More Than an Athlete: Teaching the Whole Student

Stay informed of our latest posts plus resources on teaching by subscribing to our monthly newsletter! In one of my first sections as a Philosophy Teaching Assistant at UConn, I overheard an exchange between a student athlete and another classmate that I will never forget. As the students were packing up and heading out, the […]

Public Speaking Tips for New Instructors

By Maria DelGreco When I was first accepted into a graduate program in communication, I was assigned to be a discussion instructor for Public Speaking, a class that I had never taken let alone taught before. I was barely older than my students, fresh out of an undergraduate program, with zero teaching experience, and I […]

The Interrelatedness Between Teaching and Academic Advising

By Emma-Björngard-Basayne As someone who both teaches introductory philosophy courses and works as an Academic Advisor in the UConn School of Business, I have always felt that there is a strong connection between teaching and advising. Early on, I realized that my experiences advising and teaching were informing each other. For example, from advising, I […]

Provocation Pedagogy

By Krista Dotzel “But who are we to judge whether a 15 year old Yanomami girl in the Amazon can marry a 35 year old?! That’s being ethnocentric!” This impassioned proclamation came from a previously quiet and checked-out student in the introductory cultural anthropology class I was teaching. Other students in the class weren’t having […]

Not Just Trigger Warnings: Supporting Survivors of Sexual & Domestic Violence in the Classroom

By Lynne Alexander Sitting here in the aftermath of the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings and swearing-in ceremony, I feel anguished and drained. Surviving in this fractured and divided nation and being bombarded with imagery and rhetoric from all sides that is potentially triggering and deeply upsetting has been a struggle. The past few weeks were particularly […]

Diversity for Beginners: Easy First Steps Toward More Inclusive Courses

By Cynthia DeRoma Diversity and inclusion matter not just for equal opportunity considerations, but also for academic outcomes. Scholars who feel the objectivity of their field preempts them from having to worry about issues of inclusion should be aware that recent research has been showing positive correlations between diversity and academic success. For example, Steffens […]