Blog

Not Just Trigger Warnings: Supporting Survivors of Sexual & Domestic Violence in the Classroom

By Lynne Alexander Sitting here in the aftermath of the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings and swearing-in ceremony, I feel anguished and drained. Surviving in this fractured and divided nation and being bombarded with imagery and rhetoric from all sides that is potentially triggering and deeply upsetting has been a struggle. The past few weeks were particularly […]

Diversity for Beginners: Easy First Steps Toward More Inclusive Courses

By Cynthia DeRoma Diversity and inclusion matter not just for equal opportunity considerations, but also for academic outcomes. Scholars who feel the objectivity of their field preempts them from having to worry about issues of inclusion should be aware that recent research has been showing positive correlations between diversity and academic success. For example, Steffens […]

Whose (dis)comfort? Claiming, Naming, and Holding Pronouns in the Classroom

By Susan B. Marine Hi, my name is Susan, and my pronouns are she, her, and hers. So goes my standard introduction these days, at everything from faculty meetings, to church functions, to meeting the new barista at my local coffee shop/office. It rolls off my tongue quite naturally, but this was not always so. […]

The Pedagogy of Podcasts

Sign up for our monthly teaching newsletter here! By Kristi Kaeppel & Emma Bjorngard-Basayne At various points in the last few years, a captivating, slightly unnerving, and we suspect not unique thought has gripped us: a great deal of our learning happens via podcasts. We say unnerving considering the effort, time, and money spent on […]

When Parents Can’t Help: How Can We Support First-Generation College Students?

In the following post, PhD student in sociology Jessica Yorks, discusses the challenges–and assets– first-generations bring to higher education. Based on her personal experiences and conversations with others, she offers advice on how instructors can better support first-generation students while recognizing the value of the perspectives they bring to higher education. For many of us, […]

Being a Resource for Student Mental Health

By James Ziegler There’s always at least one student who signs up for my classes only to never be heard from again. Maybe they forgot to drop. Maybe I need to update my grade book.  With each zero I give out for participation, the question lingers: should I reach out? Early on in my teaching […]