Blog

Challenging the Stigma of Community College Students & Alumni

Editor’s note: This is the first post in a two-part series on working with community college students and/or alumni. Samantha E. Lawrence The word “college” is often connoted with emerging adults attending 4-year universities as “full-time students,” living in dorms, and balancing their course loads with keg parties. Students’ college experiences, however, may differ radically […]

Prompting and Scaffolding Student Thinking

By Kristi Kaeppel Throughout my teaching career, I’ve seen standards for students’ academic performance rise and curricula adjust to meet new demands. These well-intentioned efforts by policy makers and administrators have done a good of identifying skills that students should gain during their education, but it’s been left to instructors themselves to figure out how […]

The Writing Classroom as Studio

“While the fields of writing and science might strike many as completely different if not diametrically opposed, once I began to look more closely at their histories, I realized how much was shared. Notions of learning by doing—as opposed to learning by listening to lectures and regurgitating that content on multiple-choice exams, whether that doing […]

A Short Pause Goes a Long Way: Using the Pause Procedure in Teaching

By Anna Marie LaChance Picture yourself as an undergraduate student, sitting in a standard lecture hall, staring at a whiteboard as a professor makes their way through a long lecture. Maybe it’s a detailed mathematical derivation or a careful dissection of a literary work. You and the nearly one hundred other students sit in silence […]

More Than an Athlete: Teaching the Whole Student

Stay informed of our latest posts plus resources on teaching by subscribing to our monthly newsletter! In one of my first sections as a Philosophy Teaching Assistant at UConn, I overheard an exchange between a student athlete and another classmate that I will never forget. As the students were packing up and heading out, the […]

Public Speaking Tips for New Instructors

By Maria DelGreco When I was first accepted into a graduate program in communication, I was assigned to be a discussion instructor for Public Speaking, a class that I had never taken let alone taught before. I was barely older than my students, fresh out of an undergraduate program, with zero teaching experience, and I […]

The Interrelatedness Between Teaching and Academic Advising

By Emma-Björngard-Basayne As someone who both teaches introductory philosophy courses and works as an Academic Advisor in the UConn School of Business, I have always felt that there is a strong connection between teaching and advising. Early on, I realized that my experiences advising and teaching were informing each other. For example, from advising, I […]

Provocation Pedagogy

By Krista Dotzel “But who are we to judge whether a 15 year old Yanomami girl in the Amazon can marry a 35 year old?! That’s being ethnocentric!” This impassioned proclamation came from a previously quiet and checked-out student in the introductory cultural anthropology class I was teaching. Other students in the class weren’t having […]