Author: krk16103

Designing Your Quant Course with LGBTQ Diversity

By Timothy Bussey After some discussions about my most recent post for this blog, there was some interest in how I was planning to incorporate LGBTQ diversity into a course, POLS 2072Q: Quantitative Analysis in Political Science. In this post, I’ll discuss three major points to consider when designing your quantitative course, though it should be […]

President’s Series on Teaching Excellence 4/25

4/25 The President’s Series on Teaching Excellence The President’s Series on Teaching Excellence Great Universities have Great Teachers and the University of Connecticut is blessed with more than its fair share.  The President’s series on Teaching Excellence is designed to provide a forum to facilitate discussion and reflection on the journey from good teaching to […]

15 Minutes with a UConn Prof: Andy Ballantine

This is the second interview in our series, 15 minutes with a UConn Prof (see our first with Dr. John Redden), that captures the accumulated wisdom of our instructors. In this interview, Dr. Andy Ballantine discusses the importance of instructor enthusiasm, relevant material, and the still-pertinent but increasingly-passé lecture. What are some ways that you’ve […]

Information Literacy in the Age of Fake News and Alt-Facts

By Lisa Blansett, Associate Director of First-Year Writing, UConn and Donovan Reinwald, Instructional Librarian, HBL, UConn Being able to find out more about a topic, issue, or event is always a challenge, but when the facts may not be facts, that job is that much more difficult. Conversations about whether facts are facts can get […]

Supporting LGBTQIA+ Diversity in Your College Classroom

As an instructor of record for the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program here at the University of Connecticut, a great deal of my work in the classroom centers itself within conversations about privilege and marginalization, especially as they pertain to persons of diverse genders and sexualities. Through some conversations with colleagues and friends (both […]

Rethinking Our Academic Structures: An Interview with Dr. Mark Kohan

In connection with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s Exhibit on Implicit Bias that is being hosted at the Homer Babbidge Library at the University of Connecticut, we sat down with Neag School of Education’s Assistant Clinical Professor Mark Kohan, one of the people instrumental in bringing the exhibit to UConn. We discussed the topic […]

Implicit Racial Associations: Opening Up Questions for College Instructors

Over the next few weeks we present a series of blog posts exploring the role of implicit bias in teaching. The theme for these posts coincides with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s exhibition Implicit Bias & How It Affects Our Everyday Thoughts and Behaviors now on exhibit at the UConn Homer Babbidge Library.  Since […]