Author: krk16103

Differentiated Instruction with Graphic Novels: Using Unconventional Texts to Foster Positive Learning Outcomes

In my previous posts for this blog, I’ve discussed how you can support LGBTQIA+ students in your college classroom. In this post, I’ll speak about how I’ve made curricular decisions to support another student demographic–diverse learners. More specifically, I’ll be discussing the merit of using graphic novels and how doing so can actually support the […]

Info Sessions on 10/5 and 10/9

The Graduate Certificate in College Instruction will host an in-person open house in Gentry 142 on October, 5, 2017 from 11am-12pm. The purpose of the event is to give prospective applicants a chance to meet the staff and ask any questions ahead of the November 1 application deadline for spring admission. There will also be a […]

Bringing the Current into the Classroom: Thoughts and Lessons on Tackling Tough Topics with Our Students

In our valiant efforts to integrate important current topics in our classes, we need support from the university and from each other, to discuss and exchange advice and strategies on doing this well. We will need support in the form of forgiving ourselves if it doesn’t always go well. We will need to recognize that some of our classes may become tense and uncomfortable (as a story I’ll share below illustrates). To actually open minds to consider new viewpoints and shift deep-seated beliefs and biases is a precarious, slow, and often uncomfortable process. But then, such is learning.

Register for Fall Seminars on College Instruction!

Grad 6001 students and other graduate students interested in developing their competence in college instruction are invited to register for our fall 2017 college teaching seminars. All seminars are on Fridays from 1:30pm-3:30pm in Oak 111 on the Storrs Campus. Click on the links below to register and read the seminar description. 9/22: Active Learning […]

What Being a High School Dropout Taught Me About Teaching

I recently began working on a project that looks at how teachers form their beliefs and conceptions of teaching. Like so much of learning, it seems teachers’ beliefs develop incidentally through experience and observation. Perhaps we model our beloved high school science teacher or we imagine ourselves rousing students from boredom a la Robin Williams […]

Alternatives and Tweaks to PowerPoints in Large Classes

By Fahd Rafiq As a PhD student in Political Science, I have spent most of my life in educational settings. From the time I graduated high school in 1998 until now, I’ve witnessed a transition from traditional chalk board teaching to PowerPoint slideshows. Although I believe PowerPoint slideshows can be useful, I argue that they […]

LGBTQIA+ Students Speak Out: An Interview about Inclusive Educational Support

By Timothy Bussey This is the fourth and final post by PhD candidate Timothy Bussey on inclusive teaching and curriculum for LGBTQIA+ students. The following interview was conducted with a diverse group of UConn undergraduate students, who are all members of the LGBTQIA+ community. These students were selected based upon their high level of achievement […]

Eliciting the Unheard Voices in Class with Alternative Forms of Participation

This is our second post in a five-part series on harnessing technology to engage students and advance their learning. Upcoming posts will focus on using video recordings to provide feedback and increase student metacognition, enhanced use of PowerPoints to drive student learning, and practical information on flipping the classroom and recording lectures. By Emma Bjorngard-Basayne […]