Required and Elective Courses

Students in the Certificate in College Instruction must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours or 10 credit hours if required to take the practicum course in college teaching. Students should contact Dr. Robin Grenier (robin.grenier@uconn.edu) if they wish to substitute a course that is not listed on this page.

Success in the 9/10-credit program results in the Graduate Certificate in College Instruction.


I. ALL STUDENTS MUST COMPLETE:

GRAD 6001 (2 credits) Introduction to College Instruction (formerly known as EDCI 5830-001 (offered every semester): Introduction to instructional practices in higher education in general and undergraduate education in particular. Topics include instructional design and methods, evaluation and assessment, learning theory, pedagogical resources, and trends in higher education. This course is required for the Graduate Certificate in College Instruction, but open to all graduate students.

GRAD 6000 (1 credit) Seminar in College Instruction (offered every semester): Explores teaching skills that promote learning within a diverse student body in higher education. Hybrid sessions each address a specific topic in educational theory and practice. Students must complete 5 seminars of their choosing. Students will be self-directed in the completion of the course and are encouraged to select seminars that meet their professional interests, needs, and professional goals.

GRAD 6004 (1 credit) Practicum in College Teaching (required for students without any teaching/TA experience): The practicum involves observation, mentoring, participation in classroom teaching, and planning/teaching in a higher education setting. Students and their coach will develop contracts that identify individualized learning outcomes of the practicum and assessment.

I. ADDITIONALLY, STUDENTS MUST COMPLETE AT LEAST 6 CREDITS FROM THE FOLLOWING:

GCCI Program Electives:

GRAD 6002 (3 credits) Reflections on Teaching Practice (formerly known as EDCI 5830-002; offered every spring): This seminar class identifies difficult or troublesome aspects of the participants’ instruction (vexations) that can be shared with graduate colleagues in a non-threatening environment.

GRAD 6003 (3 credits) Advanced Issues in Teaching and Learning (teaching portfolios–formerly known as EDCI 5830-003; offered every fall) :This course should be taken after GRAD 6001. It provides an opportunity for graduate students interested in college teaching to design their own teaching portfolios and investigate the syllabi and curriculum of other college instructors.

OR the following electives from other departments:

ART 5340- (3 credits) Studio Art Instruction and Curriculum Planning: Teaching methods, strategies, and curriculum planning in studio art instruction.

EDCI 5550 (3 credits) Problems in the Teaching of Science Theories of teaching science with emphasis on studies of research related to current problems.

EDCI 5555 (3 credits) Environmental Education An exploration of environmental issues and instructional approaches for developing student awareness, knowledge, and stewardship of the environment. Topics include curriculum theory, curriculum development, school reform, and teaching for environmental justice.

EDCI 5875 (3 credits) Multicultural Education Interrelationships between education and various sociocultural aspects of cultural diversity and cultural pluralism, including language acquisition and diversity.

EDLR 5201 (3 credits) Influences on Adult Learning Explores the interaction of people and their environment and culture, and examines the affect of situational barriers, motivation, self-regulation, personality, gender, and life transitionson adult learners.

EDLR 5207 (3 credits) Strategies to Facilitate Adult Learning Focuses on principles and practices of adult learning facilitation, including situational and methodological factors that impact how adults learn in conventional and multimedia contexts.

ENGL 5100 (3 credits) Theory and teaching of writing This course provides insight and support for the day-to-day practice of the teaching of writing, and to encourage critical reflection on the history, values, principles and meaning of teaching writing in an academic context.

ENGL 5550-01 (3 credits) Rhetoric and Composition:  This seminar will cover the most influential figures in composition studies; sample work across several subfields (composition theory, first-year writing, basic writing, writing across the curriculum, writing assessment, second language writing, writing program administration); and survey the diverse research methods used in the field. The course should be of interest not just to those planning to specialize in rhetoric and composition but also to anyone with a keen interest in teaching writing.

*Note the topic of ENGL 5550 above and ENGL 6550: Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition varies, but usually deals with teaching writing in higher education. If it doesn’t that semester, it may not be eligible for the certificate*

ENGL 6750-20/21 (To be taken together – 6 credits) Special Topics in Language and Literature (The Connecticut Writing Project (CWP) Summer Institute The CWP Summer Institute is an invitational program for interested teachers and graduate students from all disciplines. Accepted applicants receive an Aetna Fellowship to spend four weeks studying the history of composition and current composition theory, and to practice their own writing in an intensive workshop setting. The goal is to help the participants to become better writers and better teachers of writing. Students prepare a research-based professional development workshop and a portfolio of original writing.

ENGR 5300 (3 credits), Special Topics: Engineering Teaching and Learning  This course is intended to provide an opportunity for School of Engineering Graduate Students to become familiar with, and to develop skills associated with, successful engineering academic careers. Among other objectives, students will be able to create instructional materials for different pedagogies associated with the organization and delivery of a course, describe and evaluate pedagogical situations with students of varying backgrounds and cultures and how they relate to different learning styles.

EPSY 5199-035 (3 credits) Independent Study in Education Supervised teaching of a course in EPSY. The student will observe classes taught by the supervising faculty member, participate in some grading, and provide support and feedback to students seeking initial teaching certification. In addition, the student will provide support during classroom active and cooperative learning activities, and be responsible for planning and teaching some course content. The student will discuss pedagogical decisions, such as those related to the syllabus, course objectives, assignments, and course content, with the faculty member. The student will write a reflective document on the course, highlighting lessons learned and next steps.

EPSY 5220 (3 credits) Introduction to Educational technology Instructional applications of productivity software and educational technology.

GEOG 6800 (1 credit) Practicum in college teaching in geography
Guided development of college-level instruction. Drafting of course objectives, selection of texts, development of course and lecture outlines, selection of grading mechanisms, and incorporating feedback for improvement of instruction.

GERM 5380/ROML 5395 (3 credits), German Language Methodology
Exploration and analysis of a range of theories, issues, and problems in German instruction. Focus on the nature of language acquisition, methods, and implications for practice.

HDFS 5010 (3 credits) Practicum in University Teaching of Human Development and Family Studies
Supervised teaching of undergraduate courses in HDFS. The student will create a syllabus, course objectives and respective assessments, and some course content, as well as present a teaching philosophy. The student will observe several classes taught by the supervising faculty member, participate in some grading, and discuss pedagogical decisions with the faculty member. The student will write a reflective document on the course, highlighting lessons learned and next steps.

HIST 5103 (3 credits) Teaching History This course will address the need to formally train our graduate students for careers as educators, communicating knowledge about the past to diverse audiences, both within and outside school.

KINS 6505 (3 credits) Teaching Strategies to Enhance Learning for Health Fitness & Sport Professionals: The course provided students with a “hands-on” approach to the translation of learning theories and styles and the principles of curriculum development, design and assessment into the practice of activities that enhance learning for health fitness and sport professionals.

MATH 5000 (1 credit) Mathematical pedagogy The theory and practice of teaching mathematics at the college level. Basic skills, grading methods, cooperative learning, active learning, use of technology, classroom problems, history of learning theory, reflective practice.

MATH 5800 (1 credit) Seminar in Mathematics Education This course is a basic introduction to research in mathematics education. What makes an educational research project compelling? What are possible design models and pitfalls? How can we judge the rigor and reliability of studies done by others? What are the current prevailing standards? Research mathematicians, in general, lack familiarity with these issues, but they need to understand them in order to become critical readers of educational literature and engage in their own research projects. Activities will include: (1) reading a sampling of book chapters and research articles; (2) discussing and critiquing these articles; (3) surveying the different kinds of research available and sorting the relevant journals into various categories; (4) designing a research study that focuses on a particular question of interest.

NURS 5700 (3 credits) Health Professions Education: Evaluation This course will introduce students to important principles of adult learning, evaluation science, curriculum and instruction, diffusion of innovations research, and to evidence-based practices of health professions education.  The course will focus on planning and evaluating educational activities for health care professionals.

NURS 5710 (3 credits) Health Professions Education: Planning This course will introduce students to important principles of adult learning and curriculum and instruction, and to evidence-based practices of health professions education. The course addresses critical aspects of implementing educational activities for health care professionals.

PSYC 6505 (3 credits) Teaching experimental psychology The lecture method applied to teaching undergraduate courses in experimental psychology (introductory, cognition, learning and memory, sensation and perception) and giving conference presentations. Attention is given to presentation style and content.

ROML 5395 (3 credits) Applied linguistics for teachers of romance languages (suitable for all language majors) This course addresses learning to critique, and practice effective techniques for teaching and evaluating foreign language. Students sharpen their observation skills and reflect on their own teaching practice through self- and peer-observation. Students also learn from the creation of portfolio activities and other artifacts and their reflections about them.

WS 5395 (3 credits) Feminist pedagogy This course provides an overview of the relevant research and pedagogical tools for theoretical and practical use in Women’s Studies classrooms. We will explore the limits and possibilities for designing and implementing ‘interdisciplinary’ and ‘intersectional’ courses as well as strategies for introducing students to feminist praxis through experiential learning.  The themes for the course include: the politics of experience in Women’s Studies, exploring the relationship between feminist praxis and Women’s Studies pedagogy, demonstrating how feminist activism can be incorporated into introductory Women’s Studies courses as well as senior seminars, providing exemplars of courses designed to teach intersectionality and critical self-reflexivity, and illustrating the pedagogical power of community partnerships for experiential education. The course emphasizes the diversity of approaches to teaching women’s studies and how faculty have responded  to the varied institutional, political, regional, and demographic contexts in which we teach.